Essay Iii Richard

”But the others assembled in the crowd, whether from indifference or from fear or from the catastrophically mistaken belief that there is no real difference between Richard and the alternatives, are silent, “like dumb statues or breathing stones.” Not speaking out — simply not voting — is enough to bring the monster to power.

Shakespeare’s words have an uncanny ability to reach out beyond their original time and place and to speak directly to us.

Instead there is the soliciting of popular votes, complete with a fraudulent display of religious piety, the slandering of opponents and a grossly exaggerated threat to national security. Shakespeare evidently wanted to emphasize the element of consent in Richard’s rise.

He is not given a robust consent; only a municipal official and a few of the villain’s carefully planted henchmen shout their vote: “God save Richard, England’s royal king!

The problem was not England’s, where a woman of exceptional intelligence and stamina had been on the throne for more than 30 years, but it had long preoccupied thoughtful people.Fourth, there are those who persuade themselves that they can take advantage of Richard’s rise to power.They see perfectly well how destructive he is, but they are confident that they will stay safely ahead of the tide of evil or manage to seize some profit from it.As the play conceives it, Richard’s villainy was readily apparent to everyone.There was no secret about his fathomless cynicism, cruelty and treacherousness, no glimpse of anything redeemable in him and no reason to believe that he could govern the country effectively.“I like you, lads.” It is not necessary to look around to find people who embody this category of collaborators.They are we, the audience, charmed again and again by the villain’s jaunty outrageousness, by his indifference to the ordinary norms of human decency, by the lies that seem to be effective even though no one believes them, by the seductive power of sheer ugliness.We have long looked to him, in times of perplexity and risk, for the most fundamental human truths. Do not think it cannot happen, and do not stay silent or waste your vote. Meredith collects data to deliver the best content, services, and personalized digital ads.The scene — anomalously enough in a society that was a hereditary monarchy but oddly timely for ourselves — is an election.Unlike “Macbeth” (which introduced into the English language the word “assassination”), “Richard III” does not depict a violent seizure of power.

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  1. Markus Zusak chose this method of storytelling to show that non-Jewish people living in Germany also suffered immensely from Hitler’s reign; as most people assume that it was only the Jewish people that had it bad in those times.