Homework Connection

It links you with research-based information that you can use to connect schools, families, and communities.Annotation: The purpose of this study is to explore whether Teachers Involve Parents in Schoolwork (TIPS) interactive homework process contributes to students' writing scores and report card grades over one school year, and how students and their families react to the TIPS process.Accessible online, Homework Connection provides safe and secure tutoring sessions in subjects such as English, math, science and reading, and in test preparation, as well as access to interactive features and self-study resources.You are viewing a record from the Connection Collection, a searchable annotated bibliography database.For families, homework can be a challenge, whether the issue is, content-based, time management, or fear, frustration or anxiety.Here are some resources that may help make tackling (or completing) homework a more positive experience.

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It did not use a comparison group or measure the impact of homework and family involvement on classroom teaching.Lower-income black and Hispanic households with children trail comparable white households with children by about 10 percentage points.Asian Americans, by contrast, outperform the other groups in broadband adoption for households with children, regardless of income level.In 2013, the Lifeline program provided

It did not use a comparison group or measure the impact of homework and family involvement on classroom teaching.

Lower-income black and Hispanic households with children trail comparable white households with children by about 10 percentage points.

Asian Americans, by contrast, outperform the other groups in broadband adoption for households with children, regardless of income level.

In 2013, the Lifeline program provided $1.8 billion worth of telephone subsidies for qualified low-income people.

The FCC has not yet provided estimates of how much it would cost to add broadband subsidies to the program, but the debate will undoubtedly focus on overall program costs and how many households would be covered. A new Pew Research Center analysis finds most American homes with school-age children do have broadband access – about 82.5% (about 9 percentage points higher than average for all households).

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It did not use a comparison group or measure the impact of homework and family involvement on classroom teaching.Lower-income black and Hispanic households with children trail comparable white households with children by about 10 percentage points.Asian Americans, by contrast, outperform the other groups in broadband adoption for households with children, regardless of income level.In 2013, the Lifeline program provided $1.8 billion worth of telephone subsidies for qualified low-income people.The FCC has not yet provided estimates of how much it would cost to add broadband subsidies to the program, but the debate will undoubtedly focus on overall program costs and how many households would be covered. A new Pew Research Center analysis finds most American homes with school-age children do have broadband access – about 82.5% (about 9 percentage points higher than average for all households).With approximately 29 million households in America having children between the ages of 6 and 17, according to Pew Research Center analysis of U. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey data, this means that some 5 million households with school-age children do not have high-speed internet service at home.Low-income households – and especially black and Hispanic ones – make up a disproportionate share of that 5 million.In other words, low-income homes with children are four times more likely to be without broadband than their middle or upper-income counterparts.The other notable difference in home broadband adoption pertains to the race and ethnicity of the householder.This low-income group makes up about 40% of all families with school-age children in the United States, according to the bureau’s American Community Survey.(The survey asked questions on home internet use for the first time in 2013.) By comparison, only 8.4% of households with annual incomes over $50,000 lack a broadband internet connection at home.

.8 billion worth of telephone subsidies for qualified low-income people.The FCC has not yet provided estimates of how much it would cost to add broadband subsidies to the program, but the debate will undoubtedly focus on overall program costs and how many households would be covered. A new Pew Research Center analysis finds most American homes with school-age children do have broadband access – about 82.5% (about 9 percentage points higher than average for all households).With approximately 29 million households in America having children between the ages of 6 and 17, according to Pew Research Center analysis of U. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey data, this means that some 5 million households with school-age children do not have high-speed internet service at home.Low-income households – and especially black and Hispanic ones – make up a disproportionate share of that 5 million.In other words, low-income homes with children are four times more likely to be without broadband than their middle or upper-income counterparts.The other notable difference in home broadband adoption pertains to the race and ethnicity of the householder.This low-income group makes up about 40% of all families with school-age children in the United States, according to the bureau’s American Community Survey.(The survey asked questions on home internet use for the first time in 2013.) By comparison, only 8.4% of households with annual incomes over ,000 lack a broadband internet connection at home.

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