Research Paper Introduction Anecdote Essay On Youth And Moral Values

Let’s take it section by section, one directive at a time. Go through and find the concepts the prof wants you to cover in the paper. Lord love ‘em, but professors are notorious for giving more information than necessary or saying more than what needs saying, so do your best to boil the assignment down to the essentials with your highlighter: Take note, these macro concepts are often suggestions, not commands. These are the items that must be included in the paper for you to get a good grade.

They are the prof telling you how to be impressive, clear, or to raise your grade through a demonstration of your wits and knowledge. Usually they are very specific: Clearly, if your paper uses first-person pronouns, it will irk the person giving you the grade—probably best to stay away from that.

Now that you understand why profs are such format sticklers, take a look at the rubric: The rubric is a list of direct touch points that will be examined by the professor as they grade your work.

Take note, they’re specific and they break down your potential performance.

With all the things you have going on as a student, writing a paper can seem like a daunting task.

Many students opt to put off that daunting task, which ultimately leads to bad grades on papers that would otherwise have been easy A's.

In this case, you can see five discrete categories, each with its own stakes, and the number value that corresponds to your performance: The prof will take the rubric and keep it within reach while grading.

If the professor does not provide these things to you, don’t be afraid to ask for them.

If you know that, you can write to the rubric and pick up easy points along the way.

Universities mandate that professors given students rubrics or some form of assessment guideline.

To begin with the end in mind, you need to follow three simple steps: Take a few moments to review the assignment and rubric with a pen and highlighter, making notes and underlining key elements the prof wants to see.

Once you know what the prof wants, you can write a one sentence reference that you can refer to whenever you feel like you’re going off course.

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