Theories Of Problem Solving About Your Family Essay

The recent transition to the information age has focused attention on the processes of problem solving and decision making and their improvement (e.g., Nickerson, Perkins, & Smith, 1985; Stice, 1987; Whimbey & Lochhead, 1982).In fact, Gagne (1974, 1984) considers the strategies used in these processes to be a primary outcome of modern education.

One conclusion that may be drawn from these investigations is that individual differences in problem solving and decision making must be considered to adequately understand the dynamics of these processes (Stice, 1987).Separate research on personality and cognitive styles has identified important individual differences in how people approach and solve problems and make decisions.This paper relates a model of the problem-solving process to Jung's theory of personality types (as measured by the MBTI) and identifies specific techniques to support individual differences.These steps will be discussed in greater detail later in this paper.Consideration of Individual Differences Although there are a variety of ways to consider individual differences relative to problem solving and decision making, this paper will focus on personality type and temperament as measured by the MBTI.Because of the widespread relevance of social problem solving, this book is not only for researchers and mental health practitioners, but also for students and other readers who would like to maximize their effectiveness and success in dealing with real and complex problems in everyday living. Chang is an Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychology and a Faculty Associate in Asian/Pacific Islander American Studies at the University of Michigan. D'Zurilla has published numerous theoretical and research articles on these topics. Nezu of the second edition of (2002, Multi-Health Systems, Inc.). Specific techniques that can be used in the problem-solving/decision-making process to take advantage of these differences are also identified.The integrated process is applicable to a variety of individual and group situations.Although there is increasing agreement regarding the prescriptive steps to be used in problem solving, there is less consensus on specific techniques to be employed at each step in the problem-solving/decision-making process.There is concurrent and parallel research on personality and cognitive styles that describes individuals' preferred patterns for approaching problems and decisions and their utilization of specific skills required by these processes (e.g., encoding, storage, retrieval, etc.).

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