What Does Critical Thinking Mean In Psychology

Critical thinking can be seen as having two components: 1) a set of information and belief generating and processing skills, and 2) the habit, based on intellectual commitment, of using those skills to guide behavior.

In its exemplary form, it is based on universal intellectual values that transcend subject matter divisions: clarity, accuracy, precision, consistency, relevance, sound evidence, good reasons, depth, breadth, and fairness.

They work diligently to develop the intellectual virtues of intellectual integrity, intellectual humility, intellectual civility, intellectual empathy, intellectual sense of justice and confidence in reason.

They realize that no matter how skilled they are as thinkers, they can always improve their reasoning abilities and they will at times fall prey to mistakes in reasoning, human irrationality, prejudices, biases, distortions, uncritically accepted social rules and taboos, self-interest, and vested interest. But much of our thinking, left to itself, is biased, distorted, partial, uninformed or down-right prejudiced.

By developing these skills, students will learn more, enjoy their courses more, and experience greater academic success.

This course will help you understand what critical thinking skills are and why they're so important.

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  1. There was no backing from abroad so consented to meet Hitler. Germain results in the lost of Sudetenland by Austria due to some reason that they were not able to get assistance from France, the Czech Premier, Benes, assembled alone.

  2. Suzuki returned to Japan in 1909 as lecturer of English at Imperial University and professor of English at Gakushuin (Peers' School). He remained at Otani University until he began an active retirement in 1940.